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Monday, March 2, 2009

The Corky Coral Tree


In bloom now, all across India, is the Corky Coral tree which
is also known as the Indian Coral tree. This is a medium-sized
thorny tree with eye-catching vibrant blooms. The flowering
period is January to late March/early April. In winter, the
leaves fall, then the blooms make an appearance. There are
just a few leaves on this tree. They'll return when the blooms
fade away.

This is a variety of Erythrina but I'm not too sure about the
exact name. They all look similar-- spectacular in the dry
landscape of an Indian winter.

I got these shots on the outskirts of the city. An empty plot of
land, a gate wide open...I didn't even attempt to fight temptation!
And here are the results! I hope you enjoy going through these
pictures...

21 comments:

Mildred said...

What beautiful color and YES, I LOVE these pictures today. Thank you Kanak and have a great day.

tina said...

It IS a wonderful color. Does it have a scent? I can see where it will lighten the landscape so much!

Kanak Hagjer said...

Oh thanks Mildred. You have a great day too!

Tina, although this tree is common, it is usually not grown in home gardens. In fact I've never found out whether they have any kind of fragrance. Let me see..

Randy Emmitt said...

Kanak,

Never seen anything like these trees so colorful. Thanks as always for sharing them with us.

HelenJ said...

They are really gorgeous. What a lovely red colour!

islandgal246 said...

Mine have just finished flowering, we call it the imortelle in Trinidad and Barbados. They are very easy to grow, just take a branch and stick it in a large pot and soon you will have a nice size tree to plant.

Carla said...

now isn't this interesting? I have never seen such a thing, WOW! Thanks for sharing, especially the close up:)

easygardener said...

It is a beautiful flower and the colour is particularly attractive. The tree must stand out in the landscape with all those red flowers!

Sue said...

That sure is pretty, and I love the color, too.

Nicole said...

I love the spectacular bloom of the Erythrina. I have two small trees similar to these that I grew from cuttings that are now 6 feet each, and also 2 Erythrina crista galli which I grew from seeds I ordered. I planted the seeds only in August and one already put out a branch of blooms!

Susie said...

Hi Kanak, this is the third time I have left a comment. Obviously, me and Mr. Blogger are not getting along. This bloom is quite pretty. It reminds me of a canna lily bloom. Does it have a fragrance?

perennialgardener said...

What a hot summery bloom! It's interesting that you said they are everywhere but not necessarily in people's yards. That is the same thing we have with our Mimosa Tree which is like a weed sprouting up alongside the roads. Very pretty when it's in bloom though.

joey said...

The Corky Coral tree is indeed delightful. Thanks for sharing your piece of heaven, Kanak :)

Kanak Hagjer said...

Good morning all!

Tina--about the scent, there's none at all! Despite that, the tree attracts a large number of birds, bees, and wasps.

Randy/ HelenJ, thanks for stopping by. In the north-east, the tree is used as a support for betel-nut leaf vine and in other parts of India, as a support for pepper and grape vines. The leaves provide shade for the vines in summer. And in winter the leaves fall and the vines get enough sun.

Helen, I've heard that it's easy to grow. It's the lack of space which stops me from doing so. Thanks for mentioning the name of the tree in T&B.

Carla/Easygardener/Sue, thanks. The blooms do stand out. You can't miss that colour!!

Nicole, this variety could be the stricta var. suberosa or variegata. Your ones must be looking gorgeous. That's fast, isn't it?

Susie, I've had the same issue too, but luckily not with yours. No, there's no fragrance despite the blooms looking so spectacular.

Thanks for mentioning the Mimosa tree Racquel. In the rural areas the Erythrina is used for hedges...the thorns keep away cattle from straying inside the field/compound. Also the wood is used for fuel. There are only two trees in my neighbourhood used as a support for betel-nut leaf vine.

Kanak Hagjer said...

Joey, your comment came as I was replying to my earlier ones. So glad you stopped by. Thank you so much!

Elke said...

Hello Karnak, this is a very colorful tree. You would never find it in Germany. But we have a wonderful tree with beautiful blue blooms. It is called "Blauglockenbaum" or "Paulownia tomentosa".
Elke

Frances said...

Hi Kanak, what a blaze of glorious color. I had to laugh at you and the open gate! Why, it was an invitation for a photography extravaganza! I can imagine a mass planting of these on a hillside somewhere, magnificent. Thanks for sharing, I had never heard of them.
Frances

Wendy said...

Very pretty! I love that rich red colour!

Kanak Hagjer said...

Hi elke, thanks for dropping by. And for telling me about the Blauglockenbaum. I'll google the images.

Frances, mass planting on a hiiside would do wonders to the landscape! It's good to imagine...thanks for visiting.

Wendy, delightful, isn't it?

Mildred said...

Hi Kanak, Thank you for your visits to my blog and for the kind comments about my sidebar pictures I recently added. I am letting a few of my friends know that Nalley's brain MRI shows abnormality and he is scheduled for a spinal tap on Mar. 11 and we get the results on Mar. 17. I wanted you to know. Thanks.

Kanak Hagjer said...

Mildred, I just hope that whatever it is, it won't be all that bad. Thanks for letting me know. Nalley and you will be in my thoughts and in my prayers. Take care and good luck.